We are told often about the importance of diet and exercise in our lives. I’d like to think about diet and exercise in a spiritual-religious context.

With physical diet and exercise, we know that even if you aren’t on a specific diet, you still eat. We know that even if you don’t have a set (or even healthy) exercise routine, you still have an exercise practice.

Similarly, even if you don’t have a prescribed spiritual practice, you still have a spiritual practice.

For example, you have gratitude practice. Your gratitude practice is made up of the number of times a day you complain and the number of times a day you are thankful. It might not be a consciously chosen gratitude practice. It might not be a beneficial gratitude practice. But, it still is a gratitude practice.

Are you curious about your spiritual fitness?

I’ve created a spiritual fitness self-assessment to help.

In the coming months, I will be offering programs oriented towards helping you become more spiritually fit. I will be offering you a spiritual-diet and spiritual-exercises to help your spiritual practice.

It’s a rough time for many in this country right now. I believe a healthy spiritual practice can help lift us in the midst of fear and dread.

In the meanwhile, notice what you do in the face of your anxiety. Notice (not judge) how you find yourself comforting yourself – surfing the web, social media, checking email, binge watching shows, getting riled with the media, making plans, and keeping yourself busy. Those are all aspects of your current spiritual practice. Nothing that is super harmful. Just things that we do to self-sooth. And self-care is important.

 

How to be loving

How to be more loving I had a lengthy text exchange with a friend. A little editing was done to change the format to match that of a typical “advice column.”   Dear rB, You talk about loving and not being filled with hate. I remember this past summer you turned...
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God called me to be me: a rabbi

God called me to be me: a rabbi This article is a little different from the usual. There is no explicit moral at the end. I hope that this article – a theological coming out – inspires you nonetheless. 23 years ago, I was in my first year of rabbinical school. Like...
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Spiritual Diet

We are told often about the importance of diet and exercise in our lives. I'd like to think about diet and exercise in a spiritual-religious context. With physical diet and exercise, we know that even if you aren't on a specific diet, you still eat. We know that even...
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Anger Not Hate

Over the years, I have written a lot about ANGER. I have written about the proper ways to be angry. I have written about not taking in other people's anger. I have written about how even enlightened-minded folk have anger. I have written about the natural and...
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Frog or Fish: How Much Do You want it?

  One of my favorite "koans" about learning: There are three frogs sitting on a lily pad. One decides to jump in the water. How many are on the lily pad? The answer is three, not two. The one decided to jump in the water – we don't know that it did. The moral:...
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Towards Abundance

Living with gratitude. Living with abundance This is a LONG article. Please consider taking time to print this or carve out five minutes to read and reflect. It is an important article. It talks about living a religiously, spiritually fulfilled life. I am a big...
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FE(joy)AR

You might be scared. In many ways, it is a scary time. The future is uncertain. It feels very uncertain right now. I don’t need to convince you of how scared the world seems. You know that. What I want to talk to you about is our need to find joy amidst the...
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Hanukkah

Hanukkah The two most common questions I hear about Hanukkah are When is Hanukkah this year? What is the proper spelling of Hanukkah? After I answer these questions, I would like to explain that we are asking the wrong questions. The question we ought to ask about...
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What’s it worth?

What is it worth? For years, I have taught a gem from the Talmud that addresses worth: Who is rich? Whoever is happy with what they have. Pirkei Avot 4:1a Isn’t that brilliant? If you are content with what you have, you are wealthy. My students, in return, have taught...
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Be kind to yourself. And others.

Be kind to yourself. And others.  #wisdom_biscuit: Be forgiving. Of yourself. And others. I received a text message from my buddy, Fritz. It was typed in letters from the Hebrew alphabet. But it was neither Hebrew nor Yiddish; it was Ladino. Yiddish evolved from...
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