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Complaining as a spiritual practice

 

Complaining as a spiritual practice

 

What do these things have in common?

  • Phones
  • Spam
  • Fatigue
  • Prices
  • Internet
  • Weather
  • School/Work

These things are listed among the top things about which people complain.

 

 

 

Using complaints as a spiritual practice 

  1. Noun about which you might complain: ____(1)_____ .
  2. What would you like instead that would satisfy you? ____(2)_____.


A mad-libs guide

If you complain about ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain), it is because ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain) is not something you like or want; it is not right based on your estimations of what is right

So, ____(1)_____(thing about which you complain) is alerting you to a problem you have in the world. 

You don’t like ____(1)_____(thing about which you complain).
What you really want is ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you).

 

Some questions:

1. Can you imagine an end of  ____(1)_____(thing about which you complain)?
2. Can you get ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you)?
3. Will complaining help end  ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain) or bring you  ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you)?
4. Is there something else that will cease  ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain) or result in  ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you)?
5. If complaining will not end  ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain) or bring about ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you), then why do it?
6. No, really? What’s complaining doing for you? 

 

 

Here’s an idea of what might work:

If complaining will not work, let us instead turn our attention to something that might end  ____(1)_____ (thing about which you complain) and bring about  ____(2)_____ (thing that would satisfy you). Brainstorm three things that might end your suffering and help you gain satisfaction? 

1. _________

2. _________

3. _________

Conclusion

Complaining does has its place. Venting, blowing off steam, getting filled up by much needed love is necessary. What I’m advocating is not doing it unconsciously.

I think we are a little addicted to our suffering and complaining.

If you want to learn easy practices to increase gratitude and diminish complaints, click here.

 

OTHER GOODNESS:

Hello!

Hello!

Rabbi Brian Zachary Mayer

I’m glad you are here. Really. I know this is just a website. But, if I think of it as my home on the web, I want you to feel at home. Let me know if I can be of help. And, if you haven’t signed up for the newsletter, let me suggest that you do. It’s pretty awesome – something spiritual in your in-box 40 / 52 weeks a year.
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